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Bone Broth Recipe

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Making your own homemade bone broth is so easy and so affordable, you’ll wonder why you ever purchased the store bought stuff! Made with basically free ingredients, you’re just a few hours away from this nourishing pantry staple.

bone broth in jars

But First, What is Bone Broth?

Bone broth has gained popularity in recent years due to its numerous health benefits. It’s rich in nutrients and minerals like collagen, gelatin, and amino acids, which can help support joint health, improve digestion, and boost the immune system. It is also a great source of minerals like calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus.

Making your own bone broth at home is a simple process, and it can be a great way to use up leftover bones and vegetables.

Can I Use Any Type of Bones to Make Bone Broth?

Yes, you can use a variety of bones to make bone broth, including chicken, beef, lamb, pork, and more. Different types of bones will give the broth different flavors and nutrient profiles.

What Kind of Scraps do I Save for Bone Broth?

I highly recommend keeping a bag or container in your freezer and save your kitchen scraps and bones. I keep mine in a freezer bag and constantly add to it as I cook meals. Not all vegetables work well in a broth, so I limit the scraps I save to just onion, shallot, leek, garlic, carrot, celery, and fresh herbs like parsley, oregano, thyme, etc. When a recipe calls for an onion, don’t throw the skins or root away…save it! Same with all the other vegetables and herbs I’ve listed. If you notice your celery getting a little limp, throw it in the freezer for your next batch of broth! Zero food waste! Other food scraps not listed here can be saved for a vegetable stock, but the ones in my recipe are best for a bone broth.

What Does Adding Vinegar to Bone Broth do?

Vinegar is often added to bone broth because it helps extract the nutrients, minerals, and collagen from the bones and connective tissue. The acidity of the vinegar helps to break down the collagen and make it more bioavailable.

Should I Add Salt to my Bone Broth?

I do NOT add salt to my bone broth until I’m ready to use it as a soup or in a recipe. You are welcome to salt your bone broth as its cooking, but since I never know what recipe I will be using it for, I prefer to keep it unsalted until ready for use.

bone broth ingredients in pot

How to Make Homemade Bone Broth

This recipe is done by simmering on the stovetop, but I have included Instant Pot and Slow Cooker Instructions as well. For full recipe details, including ingredients I used, see the printable recipe card down below.

Prep Bones (if uncooked)

If bones are uncooked, place in a roasting pan with oil and roast on 425° F for 45 minutes or until well browned.

If bones are already cooked, simply place in a large stock pot.

bone broth ingredients on sheet tray

Add Vegetables to Pot, Cover with Water, and Bring to a Boil

Add all vegetables, herbs/spices and vinegar to a pot and cover with water. Feel free to experiment with different vegetables and spices to find the combination that you like best.

Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer.

Simmer on Low

Simmer on low for anywhere from 24-48 hours. Some recipes say you must keep at a certain temperature to maintain the gelatin but I have found that just keeping it at a low simmer does the trick and the broth sets up quite well.  

This can also be done in a slow cooker on low. See below for slow cooker and Instant Pot Directions.

How long should I simmer the broth for?

The longer you simmer the broth, the more flavorful and nutrient-dense it will become. I recommend simmering the broth for at least 12 hours, but you can simmer it for up to 48 hours for a more concentrated broth. Add more water as needed.

Drain Broth

Drain broth in a fine mesh strainer into a large bowl. Drain broth again into another large bowl with a flour sack towel to strain out all the impurities.

Optional: Before pouring into mason jars, you can use a fat separator to strain out fat before storing in jars. The easiest way to strain extra fat though is to refrigerate and it will solidify at the top of the jar for easy removal. Use the fat for cooking! 

Store in Mason Jars + Refrigerate

Allow broth to cool a few minutes. Pour broth into mason jars or plastic quart containers and store in the refrigerator.

pouring bone broth into jar

Ways to Use Bone Broth

Your nourishing homemade bone broth is now ready to enjoy! It can be used as a base for soups and stews, or sipped on its own as a wholesome and flavorful beverage. You can also add it to sauces, gravies, and other dishes for an extra boost of flavor and nutrition.

Storing Bone Broth

After making your bone broth, allow it to cool slightly and then transfer it to containers and store in the refrigerator or freezer until ready to use. It can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 5 days or in the freezer for up to 6 months.

If you’re going to freeze your bone broth, make sure to use airtight, freezer safe plastic containers. Also make sure to leave some head space to allow for expansion.

Instant Pot + Slow Cooker Directions

I like to make bone broth on the stovetop, but I know others prefer to use their Instant Pot or Slow Cooker. I have included directions for those methods:

Instant Pot instructions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 425°F (200°C).
  2. Place the bones on a baking sheet and roast in the oven for 45 minutes, or until they are well browned.
  3. Transfer the roasted bones to the instant pot.
  4. Add the vinegar to the pot and let it sit for a few minutes to help extract the minerals from the bones.
  5. Add the vegetables, bay leaves, peppercorns, and enough water to cover the bones.
  6. Secure the lid on the instant pot and set it to the “soup” setting for 120 minutes.
  7. Once the cooking time is complete, allow the pressure to release naturally for at least 10 minutes before carefully releasing any remaining pressure.
  8. Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve and discard the solids.
  9. Allow the broth to cool slightly, then transfer it to containers and store in the refrigerator or freezer until ready to use.

Slow Cooker Instructions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 425°F (200°C).
  2. Place the bones on a baking sheet and roast in the oven for 45 minutes or until they are well browned.
  3. Transfer the roasted bones to the slow cooker.
  4. Add the vinegar to the pot and let it sit for a few minutes to help extract the minerals from the bones.
  5. Add the vegetables, bay leaves, peppercorns, and enough water to cover the bones.
  6. Secure the lid on the slow cooker and set it to the “low” setting for 12-24 hours.
  7. Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve and discard the solids.
  8. Allow the broth to cool slightly, then transfer it to containers and store in the refrigerator or freezer until ready to use.
bone broth in jars

Recipes to try using bone broth!

I hope you give this recipe a try and enjoy the benefits of homemade bone broth. Let me know in the comments if you have any questions or tips for making the perfect bone broth.

The printable recipe card is below. Have a great day, friends! 🙂

Bone Broth Recipe

Making your own homemade bone broth is so easy and so affordable, you'll wonder why you ever purchased the store bought stuff! Made with basically free ingredients, you're just a few hours away from this nourishing pantry staple.
Course broths
Cuisine American
Keyword bone broth
Prep Time 1 hour
Cook Time 1 day
Servings 1 stockpot

Ingredients

  • bones chicken, turkey, beef, pork lamb, etc. (or chicken feet)
  • onions including skins
  • garlic including paper
  • carrots
  • celery
  • parsley
  • black peppercorns play this by ear (1-2 tbsp)
  • 4-6 Bay Leaves
  • 2 tbsp distilled vinegar

OR USE KITCHEN SCRAPS – keep in a zip bag in the freezer for up to 3 months then turn into bone broth

  • Save all bones from dinners
  • Save all scraps, onions, garlic, carrots, celery, parsley and other herbs from cooking

Instructions

  • If bones are uncooked, place in a roasting pan with oil and roast on 425° F for 45 min, or until browned well
  • If bones are already cooked, simply place in a large stock pot
  • Add all vegetables, herbs/spices and vinegar to a pot and cover with water
  • Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer
  • Simmer on low for anywhere from 24-48 hours (this can also be done in a crockpot on low)
  • Drain broth in a fine mesh strainer into a large bowl
  • Drain broth again into another large bowl with a flour sack towel to strain out all the impurities
  • Pour broth into mason jars or plastic quart containers and store in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks
  • Optional: Before pouring into mason jars, you can use a fat separator to strain out fat before storing in jars. The easiest way to strain extra fat though is to refrigerate and it will solidify at the top of the jar for easy removal. Use the fat for cooking!
  • Freeze for up to 6 months in plastic containers.

Notes

Some recipes say you must keep at a certain temperature to maintain the gelatin but I have found that just keeping it at a low simmer does the trick and the broth sets up quite well.  

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